Breaking Bad: After 40 Years, Dietary Cholesterol Gets A Pardon From Gov’t Panel

It’s almost official – you may soon be able to enjoy egg yolks, shrimp and lobster with the government’s blessing.

Dietary cholesterol, according to the nation’s top nutritionists, isn’t such a bad guy after all.

The USA’s leading panel of nutrition experts that advises the federal government on which foods Americans should and should not eat, says dietary cholesterol can finally be delisted as a “nutrient of concern.”

For more than 40 years, the government hammered away at the evils of cholesterol in food, saying it increased the risk of heart disease – a claim routinely disproved in many scientific studies over the years.

The Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee reportedly reached its decision to lift the dietary warnings on cholesterol just this past December – the government is expected to follow the panel’s advice.

The panel went on to say low-density lipoprotein (LDL) commonly known as “bad cholesterol” in the bloodstream still poses a danger, and saturated fats in such foods as fatty meats, whole milk and butter can be linked to heart disease.

The group’s final report to the feds is expected to be completed in a few weeks.

Click here for the full Washington Post story.